What happens when something goes wrong?

What happens when something goes wrong?

What happens when something goes wrong after a treatment?
Remember that any active treatment comes with risks of potential side effects or complications. These are uncommon but do occasionally happen. As a Cosmetic Physician I am trained in dealing with these issues, unlike a local GP who may not be up to date with this specialty field.
I was reminded of this by a recent situation.
A patient who had an uneventful treatment with dermal fillers last year, suddenly developed severe swelling, discomfort and hard lumps where the filler was, this January. This is an uncommon adverse event – delayed hypersensitivity inflammatory reaction. Of course, you can also get a Biofilm – a type of infectious process around a filler, which can occur with this reaction, and even a truly infected abscess formation, which is another issue altogether!
Often a viral illness, or vaccination can trigger this response as these events boost the body’s immune reactivity. In this case though, there was no obvious trigger.
Part of being a trained professional in the specialty area of cosmetic medicine involves training not only in understanding skin and providing services but managing any resultant adverse events. In this case, the GP prescribed antibiotics, but not the ones currently recommended for this problem on recent evidence. In fact, the best antibiotics to use has been updated over the last few years, so keeping up with the latest information is also an important part of being able to deliver the best care for patients. (I’m not bagging GPs at all – it’s just that this is a specialty area. Also, therefore someone doing cosmetic treatments as a sideline to their main job, is not the best person to trust your skin care to.)
We also started a short course of Prednisolone to bring down the inflammation more rapidly. We may need to dissolve the filler, but not always. If we don’t, there is the possibility of recurrence of the reaction, but some patients would rather try and leave it there if they can. Of course, not all dermal filler products are dissolvable. If a reaction occurs with a filler that is not dissolvable, then you have a whole other problem. This is one of the reasons that I personally choose to use the hyaluronic fillers that can easily be removed in case of adverse events.
So, the take home message is, if you have a problem with a skin treatment your first call should be to the professional involved in providing the service. A cosmetic medicine doctor is a doctor and so able to treat and prescribe for you as required. At the Mayah Clinic we will always fit in urgent appointments as required. We are happy to respond to emails and answer questions over the phone. We want our patients to feel supported and cared for.